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4956
Eye-Tracking Technology to Determine Procedural Proficiency in Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia
Session: MP-03c
Thurs, April 19, 1:15-3:00 pm
Plymouth (Shubert Complex), 6th floor

Please note, medically challenging cases are removed three months after the meeting and scientific abstracts after three years.

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Eye-Tracking Technology to Determine Procedural Proficiency

in Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia

G. Andrew Wright1, MS3, Rahool Patel1, MS2, Koraly Perez-Edgar2, PhD, Adrian Zurca1, MD, Sanjib Adhikary1, MD

1. Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 2. Penn State University, Department of Psychology

Introduction

Eye tracking technology is allowing novel ways to measure accuracy, efficiency and overall knowledge of health care professionals

Ultrasound guided regional anesthesia providers may gain more insight and improve training by using and analyzing results of eye tracking simulations

Methods

The institutional IRB exempted this study as non-human.

Results

Survey found eye-tracking was easy to use and did not interfere with procedure (mean = 4.3/5 and 1.5/5 respectively)

More experience correlated to success in performing sciatic nerve block (5/5 attending's, 5/5 residents, 0/5 medical students; p=0.002) and shorter procedure time (Average time: attending's 62.6 seconds, residents 106.4 seconds, students 134.4; p = 0.089)

 Conclusions

Mobile eye-tracking is well-tolerated and provides little interference during procedure

Experts make fewer back and forth fixations, spend less time and are more effective overall

Mobile eye-tracking appears able to differentiate attention patterns between experts and amateurs

Further work is required to explore the role of eye-tracking in simulation training to increase competence and efficiency of learners

 

 

 

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