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4515
RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF ANALGESIC USE AND PAIN OUTCOMES IN THE BURNETT BURN INJURY UNIT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS MEDICAL CENTER
Session: EX-12
Sat, Nov. 18, 7:30-7:45 am
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Retrospective analysis of analgesic use and Pain outcomes in the burnett burn injury unit at the university of Kansas medical center

•Acute burn injury is not only a source of immense pain and suffering, but has also been linked to debilitating chronic pain and stress-related disorders1.
•In the United States alone, an estimated 1.25 million individuals sustain a burn injury each year2.
•Of these, between 51,000 and 71,000 require hospitalization.
•Patients with burn trauma often have an extended length of inpatient intensive care and experience severe acute pain with an elevated opioid demand.
•Furthermore, it has been reported that up to 52% of burn injury survivors experience persistent chronic pain post-injury3.
•It is widely accepted that intense prolonged and repeated exposures to acute pain may result in a pain centralization process that contributes to the evolution of chronic persistent pain4.
•Due to repetitive severe acute pain episodes during and after their hospitalizations (surgical procedures, frequent dressing changes, and rehabilitation activities), acute burn injury patients represent a population of patients who are at high risk of developing post-injury chronic pain.
•Despite major advances in burn wound management and survival, burn pain remains globally inadequately treated.
•Although multimodal analgesia has been recommended in the treatment of burn injury pain, opioid analgesics remain the “gold standard” for pain relief in this population5.
•However, opioid treatments are only partially effective and have significant risks for adverse complications including dependence, addiction, and opioid-induced hyperalgesia.
•Use of ketamine during the perioperative period has been demonstrated to reduce opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance6.
•The goal of this study was to retrospectively investigate pain outcomes and analgesic use for patients admitted to the burn unit for acute burn injury as a means of gaining information to perform further prospective research in this population.
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