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A Non-Patient Volunteer Study to Investigate the Effects of Skin Barrier Creams on Incontinence Pad Absorbency

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 A NON-PATIENT VOLUNTEER STUDY TO INVESTIGATE THE EFFECTS OF SKIN BARRIER CREAMS ON INCONTINENCE PAD ABSORBENCY

 

Skin barrier products are frequently used in conjunction with incontinence pads in order to reduce the risk of skin damage from exposure to urine and faeces for incontinent patients. The inadvertent transfer of the barrier cream from the skin to the surface of the incontinence pad has been shown to reduce the pad's absorbency, especially for the more traditional petrolatum and zinc-oxide based barrier creams1,2.

 

This compromise of the function of the incontinence pad and its reduced ability to absorb fluids increases the risk of prolonged exposure of the skin to moisture and irritants from urine and faeces, and thus the potential for incontinence-related skin damage.

 

Previous studies have demonstrated that while there is still a small amount of product transfer with the more modern silicone-based skin barrier products, this does not occur to any degree significant enough to affect incontinence pad absorbency2,3.

 

This study was performed to determine the effect on incontinence pad absorbency of five different silicone-based skin barrier products, and to identify if two products from one skin barrier protection range*,** significantly compare with the other similar commercially-available products. The five products included were three silicone-based barrier creams and two silicone-based skin protectant ointments with bioadhesives.

 

*Medi Derma-S Skin Barrier Cream **Medi Derma-Pro Skin Protectant Ointment  

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