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A COMPARATIVE IN VITRO STUDY ASSESSING THE ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF SEVERAL FOAM DRESSINGS.

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A COMPARATIVE IN VITRO STUDY ASSESSING THE ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF SEVERAL FOAM DRESSINGS.

Joseph, A.J(1) & Hinde, H(1)

(1) Advanced Medical Solutions Ltd, Winsford, Cheshire, UK.


Background: Foam dressings are beneficial for the management of many wound types with moderate to heavy exudate.  The addition of PHMB or Silver impregnated into the dressing enables the product to effectively manage infection in acute and chronic wounds.

 PHMB (Polyhexamethylene Biguanide) has broad spectrum antimicrobial activity due to its ability to disrupt the bacterial cell wall. This polymeric biguanide reacts with acidic membrane lipids and induces aggregation, leading to increased membrane fluidity and permeability, and eventual organism death1.

Silver has been known for centuries to prevent and treat infectious diseases. Silver ions kill microorganisms instantly by blocking the respiratory system (energy production), whilst having no negative effect on human cells2.

Advanced Medical Solutions have developed a trilaminate foam dressing (adhesive and non adhesive) with PHMB impregnated into the dressing (Figure 1) The dressing is indicated for moderately to heavily exuding chronic and acute wounds that are at risk of infection.

 

AIM: The aim of this study is to assess the antimicrobial activity of several PHMB and Silver foam dressings, against 3 common wound isolates, P. aeruginosa (NCIMB 8626), S. aureus (NCIMB 9518) and C. albicans (NCPF 3179) using a simulated wound fluid model over a 7 day period. This will enable for comparisons to be determined between the products tested taking into consideration the antimicrobial agent they contain and also the challenge organism they are more effective against.     

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